Tag Archives: yankees

I WONDER WHY I DON’T LIKE YANKEES FANS

7 May

I was stuck in a frustrating conversation today with some Yankees fans who did their best to push my buttons. It only added to my disgust of this breed of fans.

So often, people ask me why I dislike the Yankees?

Why can’t I root for the Yankees they ask, often reminding me that they are from New York.

While some Mets fans will disagree with me, I am keeping an eye on the Red Sox series this weekend, hoping Boston knocks the Yanks around. I am keeping my other eye on our series in a few weeks, hoping our boys cause old George to blow a fuse.

I am bringing my fiance to a Subway Series game this summer just so she can understand this reality. Before she says “I do,” she needs to understand why I dislike the Yankees and their fans so much.

I am sure it will only take one of these games to explain everything.

In my conversation that I was stuck in (it was at work), one of the genius fans from Yankees land, forced me  to listen to his endless rant about how the Mets fans are the arrogant and ignorant ones.

Have you ever heard anything so laughable?

Of course he defended his breed, saying that the Yankees fans would never boo one of their “champions.”

He apparently removed from his memory the stadium full of Bronx faithful who booed Mariano Rivera.

When we talked about managers, he was quick to list all Yankees managers as the elite crop of skippers.

He did defend Willie Randolph, saying he lost with the Mets because he didn’t have the players. I guess he sees Randolph as a Yankee. If he’s such a good manager, why did he take a bench job with the Brewers?

While I tried to speak reason with him, he managed to close his ears to all of it. He had a point to make and he made it, once again reminding me why I cannot root for the New York Yankees.

I always recall the Clemens-Piazza incident of 2000 when Clemens hit Piazza in the head with a fastball. Months later, he threw a broken bat at the Mets catcher.

Too many Yankees fans defended Clemens in his actions, ignoring any intent. Again, Yankees fans forgot how furious they were when Clemens, as a member of the Blue Jays, threw at the head of their precious Jeter.

While I can tip my cap to the Yankees and what they did last October, there is a part of me, in solidarity with so many baseball fans across this great land, that roots for their demise.

For me, it’s not about salary or player’s personalities (although there is plenty to say about that).

This is about the Yankees fans and their arrogance and inability to see beyond their stuck up noses.

When this one fan called me and my fellow  Mets fans arrogant, I asked him, what was there for us to be arrogant about.

Are we humbled, sure.

Are we pessimistic at times? Of course, how could we not be.

Arrogant? Not exactly.

It is the Yankee fan (not all, but most), who own this title.

They have earned their rings to walk with such a swagger but it is their ignorance, as experienced today, which makes these     “creatures” the part of society that I just want to crawl back under whatever rock they came from.

We Made It Through

18 Mar

By Jim Walters

Today, college basketballs bounce throughout the country and generations of fans stop in their tracks to watch the country’s greatest sports tournament. As the NCAA road to the Final Four begins this afternoon, it marks the start of a new sports season.

What makes this time of the year different is that it starts after the biggest lull in the sports year. Following the Super Bowl, there is this 4-6 week drop-off that ends with this tournament. When the tournament runs its course, baseball is waiting for us to carry our imaginations into the late Fall.

Last season’s lull was calmed by the World Baseball Classic which teased  fans with games between the world’s best. While it provided early competition, most fans spent their time rooting more for their players to stay healthy than for execution on the field.

This year, we had the Olympics which moved February along at a quicker pace. Watching curling was fine for a short while, and hockey became relevant in this country for two weeks. Yet, there was still a sports gap in this country that melts away today with each last-second shot.

We ride this tournament until the Sunday of Championship weekend. The Yankees and Red Sox open the baseball season that night.

On Monday, April 5th, we are presented with one of those special days in sports. The Mets and Marlins open the 2010 season at Citi Field in the afternoon. Later that night, the championship game is held in Indianapolis.

So, we made it through the snow, the cold and the harshness of the sports lull.

Finally we can say it, let the games begin.

See Mets in the Bronx

16 Mar

This Friday, March 19th at noon, Yankees single game tickets go on sale and the three game series with the Mets from June 18-20 appears to be on sale.

Friday’s game is scheduled for 7:05pm, Saturday for 1:05pm and Sunday is still TBD. Sunday may be an ESPN game at 8:05pm. ESPN has not picked their game yet. The Mets-Yankees Sunday night game at Citi Field will be aired on ESPN.

The Mets did not include the Yankees games at Citi Field in their single game ticket sales. You can see the Yankees, but you have to buy a package that is one of the following: four games of premium seat value, a six-pack in the upper deck level, 15-game pack, 40-game pack or full season.

Biazarro World

14 Mar

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By Jim Walters

Remember when Elaine entered bizarro world in that classic Seinfeld episode. Her new friends were complete opposites from her regular crew of Jerry, George and Kramer.

Imagine if this season for the Mets is bizarro world and everything goes right. Here’s one man’s guess of what that would  look like.

  • Jose Reyes is out for only two weeks instead of 8 and he is playing short at Citi Field on April 5th. He proves to be innocent of the hgh questions, but a certain third baseman of the Bronx can’t say the same.
  • Carlos Beltran is in centerfield by the end of April, but fans will miss the tag team efforts of Angel Pagan and Gary Matthews Jr, who held down the fort. Beltran comes back and does for the Mets what A-Rod did for the Yankees upon his May return last year. He also reveals that his mole gives him his mojo.
  • Johan Santana wins 20 games, the Cy Young and beats Roy Halladay in the three head to head match-ups this season.
  • Daniel Murphy proves Omar right, hitting .305 with 20 home runs and 95 RBIs. He also manages to play a decent first base. Keith Hernandez reminds us that he’s responsible.
  • Benjie Molina pulls a hamstring in week three and Rod Barajas hits 20 home runs and bats .260.
  • David Wright returns to his old form, hitting 30 home runs, 120 RBIs and bats .310. Wright wins the first MVP for New York.
  • Jason Bay hits 35 home runs, bats .280 and drives in 120 runs. His legs prove to be fine as Peter Gammons offers a public apology. Unfortunately its on the MLB network and no one sees it.
  • John Maine and Mike Pelfrey each win 15 games. Oliver Perez, well, not even in bizarro world is he very good.
  • Jenrry Mejia and Francisco Rodriguez become the best 1-2 punch, making most games feel like a 7-inning game.
  • Luis Castillo doesn’t drop any pop-ups.
  • Jerry Manuel doesn’t have to foolishly say he expects any of his players to be back in a week.
  • Omar Minaya gets to lead press conferences again.
  • Citi Field lowers ticket prices so families can go to a game and not miss a mortgage payment.
  • Mets retire Mike Piazza’s number.
  • Mets win the division, go on to get revenge against the Cardinals and beat the Yankees in the World Series.
  • Mets don’t mention Phillies in their championship celebration.
  • And finally, kids throughout the city trade in their Yankees jerseys for “Don’t Mess with the Johan” t-shirts.

A guy could dream….

Jeter Shows Class

13 Mar

Kevin Kernan of the New York Post contributes an interesting piece this morning about Derek Jeter commenting on Jose Reyes.

Speaking of Reyes’ most recent injury, Jeter says, “You wish him the best. I don’t like to see anybody go through that kind of stuff. It’s just that he’s had such bad luck. You have to assume that his luck is going to change here soon. All you can do is be patient.”

While it is easy for Mets fans to dislike the Yankees, Jeter continues to show class and this is just another example of why he is such a special player.

A Look Back at the 2000 Mets

10 Mar

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By Jim Walters

Ten years ago, the New York Mets entered Spring Training confident after a remarkable run in the 1999 postseason. Led by Bobby Valentine, Mike Piazza and Al Leiter, the Mets added Mike Hampton to solidify the rotation, bringing high hopes to Port St. Lucie.

During the offseason, New York bid farewell to John Olerud but welcomed fan favorite Todd Zeile to play first. Derek Bell also joined the team, quickly capturing the hearts of the New York fans with an Opening Day at Shea home run.

New York won 94 games that year, finishing with the Wild Card and their first pennant in 14 years.. Their rotation featured Hampton, Leiter, Rick Reed, Bobby Jones and Glendon Rusch. Their bullpen included Armando Benitez, John Franco, Rick White, Turk Wendell, Dennis Cook and Pat Mahomes.

It feels like yesterday when the Mets rallied from 8-1 down in the bottom of the 8th at Shea Stadium against the rival Atlanta Braves. With John Rocker sidelined and the crowd packed for the post-game fireworks show, the Mets mounted one of the more remarkable comebacks in team history, scoring 10 runs, capped by a Mike Piazza laser off the retired numbers in left field.

Who could forget the Roger Clemens- Mike Piazza rivalry that started with the beaning of Piazza in July and ended with Clemens throwing a piece of  Piazza’s broken bat at the Mets catcher in the World Series. It was a bizarre rivalry that has been debated ever since. Was Clemens using illegal substances that caused the rage and should have Piazza stormed the mound remain “what ifs” that have been debated for a decade.

The year 2000 also brought us the Benny Agbayani home run to kick off the season in game two against the Chicago Cubs in Japan. Agbayani went full circle, hitting another late-inning blast six months later to give the Mets the pivotal game three win against the San Francisco Giants in the NLCS.

It has been ten years since the Mets brought the National League pennant to New York. While the years since have been frustrating and more recently heartbreaking, the 2000 Mets were a feisty team that was easy to root for.

While the season ended in disappointment as the Yankees celebrated their 26th World Championship on the field of Shea, it was a special year for the Mets and their faithful fans.

Ghost of Shea

8 Mar

By Jim Walters

When Citi Field opened its doors to the public, the outcry from Mets fans came flowing in. While the new park in Queens showed off its shiny new apple and perfectly angled seats, fans were left asking, where are the Mets colors and Mets decor. While nice gestures like a new apple and keeping the old one, as well as the iconic skyline, connected the old and new chapters of Mets history, ownership did not do enough to make this park feel like the home stadium of the Mets.

During the season, adjustments were made. The team decided to no longer hide the few championship banners they possessed and they plastered images of old and current Mets in the inside and outside of Citi Field.

Besides the retired “Shea” that stood tall next to the numbers of Casey Stengal, Gil Hodges, Tom Seaver and Jackie Robinson, memories of Shea Stadium, the home of the Mets from 1964-2009, were noticeably absent. The memory of beloved Shea was left in the team’s past.

While the Yankees designed their new cathedral as an upgrade of  their old stadium, the Mets went for a completely new look. While many will say this was a smart move as the cookie-cutter design of the 1960s and 1970s was no longer fashionable or fan-friendly, the designers did forget to bring over the orange and blue that Shea so appropriately provided.

While the Mets played their first season at home in a ball park other than Shea Stadium for the first time since 1963, the team struggled for most of the year. After the first month, the injury bug hit this team as hard as it has ever hit a ball club in the history of this game. As the stars fell, so did the Mets in the standings. By September, Citi Field’s empty seats finally resembled the many empty Fall nights at old Shea.

Those connected to the spiritual world started to question if there was something or someone behind this sudden streak of bad luck. Sure the Mets would never be considered a winning franchise, with more losing seasons that winning ones. But, the bloating disabled list, as well as a defensive performance that had little leaguers laughing, started to reveal that someone or something had a score to settle.

Perhaps, the ghost of Shea Stadium, or maybe it was the baseball gods, who were trying to even the score, playing a part in the 2009 season. Maybe the proper tribute was not displayed to the stadium next door, as ownership continued to express how Citi Field was a great improvement, treating old Shea as the ex who was used and abused until something better came along.

Maybe 2009 was Shea’s revenge.

During the offseason, steps were taken to calm this ghost. Orange walls and a bridge named after beloved Shea were offered as peace offerings. The question left to be answered is, will it be enough?

Many fans pleaded with the Mets to change the outfield wall colors to blue. This simple move would remind the fans of Shea in its later years. While it is probably a pretty penny to replace the material, it may be the sacrifice this team needs to make to please the past so there can be a future.

Down in Florida, the injuries are starting to pile up. Jose Reyes and his thyroid, Carlos Beltran and his knee. Francisco Rodriguez can’t see and Kelvim Escobar can’t throw. Is this a simple hiccup in March or a repeat performance of last year’s plague?

It’s time the Mets make peace with old Shea.